SaferSummer

Tuesday 20th June 2017

PCSP summer campaign is urging parents to be aware of where their children are in a bid to prevent anti-social behaviour.

#safersummer

Where is your child tonight?

Ards and North Down Policing and Community Safety Partnership’s (PCSP) summer campaign is urging parents to be aware of where their children are in a bid to prevent anti-social behaviour.

Posing the poignant question, ‘Where is your child tonight?’, the key message to parents is to think about how much they actually know of their children’s whereabouts, what they’re getting up to and the potential consequences

Chair of Ards and North Down PCSP, Councillor Scott Wilson, explained:

“We all want to keep our children safe. However, young people are vulnerable and may get involved in illegal activities such as underage drinking, drugs and criminal damage. This is why we’re launching a campaign to remind parents that they should ask their children where they are, who they are with and what they are up to.

“The PCSP and other local agencies can lend support, but ultimately it is up to parents to know where their children are and to manage their behaviour. Anti-social behaviour not only negatively impacts the local community resulting in noise nuisance and littering, but can have detrimental and long-lasting consequences for the young people involved.  Ranging from alcohol related illness or accidents to being arrested, and even prosecuted, for acts such as criminal damage.  By knowing where your child is, you are safeguarding their future, and maybe even their life.”

PSNI added: PSNI District Commander, SUPT. Brian Kee, said:

“We understand the extent to which anti-social behaviour can have an adverse effect on the quality of life for the people affected by it.  We are here to listen to community concerns and work with others to find a solution to any problems they may have.  Police always seek to exploit all opportunities to address anti-social behaviour, working closely with local residents and other agencies.

This work includes enforcement, making arrests and education, helping our young people understand the impact this type of activity can have on the victim.  We also would ask parents to know where their children are and to play a role in preventing them from becoming involved in behaviour which could see them with a criminal record.

I would encourage the public to report incidents of antisocial behaviour to police on the 101 number at the earliest opportunity in a bid to help prevent and detect crime.”